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Yesterday’s post…still a day behind.

I started the morning with another home cooked meal…quiche, pound cake and berries!  It’s getting harder to leave company and houses, but my journey continues.  Today, the dogs and I began a two day loop through North Carolina’s countryside, beginning and ending near Asheville.  Just outside of Asheville we stopped at a sports complex just to get a short walk in for the dogs as it looked like they might have to wait until the afternoon for a good one.  There was a cache nearby, but also people, so no luck for picking up a North Carolina cache yet.

Our next stop was at a Cherokee Indian Trading Post right off the highway.  I meant to take a picture and forgot…oops!  I browsed through the store and found a few trinkets for two of my nieces and one of my nephews.  I hope to come home with one trip treat each for the little ones to find under the Christmas tree.  The older ones, I’m certain, would rather have iTunes!  We’ll see if I’m successful.

After my short shopping spree, the dogs and I hiked part of the Appalachian Trail across from Nantahala Outdoor Center, where kayaking and rafting appear to be the activity of choice.  As the kayakers honed their skills on the river’s rocky course, ducks bathed on the river’s edge.  I must admit, the ducks may have been more entertaining.  They reminded me of a dog…dunking under the water, scratching their head with their webbed feet, and then flappong their wings and shaking their tail feathers to dry off.  They were an active bunch.

We moved on to the Hiwassee Dam.  The mutts and I were trying to find a decent place to hike as the hike up the Appalachian Trail was steep so we only walked a short distance.  We found a beautiful lake with picnicking spots and learned the history of the Tennessee Valley Authority that controls the area, but we weren’t successful in finding any trails.

The headwaters of the Tennessee River are located in the mountains of Tennessee, Georgia, Virginia, and North Carolina.  The 41,000 acre area receives 52 inches of rain a year.  The Tennessee Valley Authority, by damming the river in several locations, is able to control floods, improve navigation, and generate electric power.  In fact, through nine main dams and associated locks, the TVA has created a navigable channel of 650 miles from Knoxville to the Ohio River which serves as an important arm of the Nation’s inland waterway system connecting 20 states.

Overall, I think today was a bit of a bust.  The area is geared more to summer-time water enthusiasts, thus Scout, Petey, and I spent most our time driving or making the most of small park areas.  Even my attempt to find a local place for dinner and Sunday night football in Murphy failed.  Tomorrow is another day!

www.nantahala-river.net, www.notablenotecards.com, http://www.etsy.com/shop/nichenotecards

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